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Futuregamer’s Custom Yugioh Archetype Guide

A complete guide to all archetypes I have created, along with links for them (all cards are public), in Duelingbook. Along with the links to the individual cards of every archetype, I will include a link to the exact recipe of the deck I am currently using.

Cards in the side deck are cards directly supported by the archetype (usually DM cards that I have made searchable/recyclable) OR cards that are technically part of the archetype but don’t actually work with the deck.

(PS: While in general I try to adhere to the PSCT rules as much as possible, I specifically choose not to use the word “monster” next to monster Types, because I think the text sounds better without it. Call it “artistic license” if you will. For example, “Fairy monsters” will be changed to “Fairies”. From what I’ve seen, Konami themselves have toyed around with this idea more than a few times, including one of my favourite cards, “Agave Dragon”. I exempt monster Summoning Materials from this and write them properly.)

Title: Sewers of the Vurko

Link
Level: Advanced
Description: The Vurko are lorewise born from the Entities, planting a seed in a nameless city’s sewers. They are the first archetype I created that doubles as entity support (the first of many), and the name is Greek for “muddy water” or “unclean water”, though it is normally used for swamp water instead of sewer water. All of the maindeck Vurko’s names are puns for “eating” related to one of their two mechanics: “Eating” (read: destroying) cards, and gaining +300 of their primary stat, which is the Deck’s toolbox. The second mechanic of the monsters is a mandatory resummoning from the GY during the End Phase, if they were destroyed and sent there this turn. It is basically the Rokkets’ mechanic, except instead of summoning new monsters from the Deck, they Summon themselves back from the GY. I affectionately call it “reform”. The Spells/Traps all have 2 effects, one of which is the ability to banish themselves from the GY to set another “Vurko” Spell/Trap from the GY. Every effect in the deck is a hopt. The main goal of the Deck is outgrinding the opponent, continuously recovering its resources while “eating” the opponent’s cards.
Deck example link

 

Title: Grand Convergence

Link
Level: Average
Description: Inspired by Dead Space, the “Converging” are Zombie Fusion monsters and Psychic Link monsters, which have sort of a symbiosis, the one requiring the other to work, and via the use of spells/traps, providing protections for each other. The idea is that the Psychic Links “reanimate” the dead, then “converging” them into the (Contact) Fusion Monsters of the archetype, during your battle phase. The whole archetype revolves around gathering the materials for the Fusions, which are always “X monsters with the names of monsters that were destroyed this turn”, the more monsters used, the stronger the Fusions. The archetype uses various tricks to achieve this, depending on how many monsters the opponent controls at the start of your turn. It’s a tier 3, but the gameplay is very fun, manipulating the names of monsters, or destroying the opponent’s monsters with cards like “Raigeki”, only to immediately resurrect them, much to the opponent’s surprise. The best feature of the archetype is that you basically contact fusion with the opponent’s monsters, though you have to have laid the groundwork in your MP1. Has a crossover with “Arachnophobia”.
Deck example link

 

An average “Vurko” monster: Two effects, both of which are hopt. One is its “eating” effect (in his case a face-up Spell/Trap Card) that will boost his highest original stat (in his case his DEF) by 300 if successful, and then his mandatory “reform” ability, during the End Phase.

 

Title: Deep Sea Song

Link
Level: Average
Description: A 5Ds era inspired Synchro Deck based on Sea Serpents, the “Deep Sea” have loose “Entity” connections, but are mostly a simplistic Synchro beatdown deck. The Deck’s main players are “Deep Sea Idol”, which with the help of a few “Salvage”s can give you a continuous stream of “Torrential Tribute” copies and “Deep Sea Singer of Cosmic Horrors”, which not only helps set up simple Synchro Summons, but also gives said Synchros protection from your own “Torrential Tribute”. Most of the cards are meant to be “splashable” in other water Decks, and I believe they would be very adequate pack fillers, while still functioning pretty respectably as a Deck on their own. Edit: I swear I made and published these way before Konami announced their Deep Sea support. Might end up deleting some of the cards, once I have playtested the new ones.
Deck example link

 

Title: Swambush

Link
Level: Average
Description: Descending from the “Vurko”, “Swambush” are a series of Flip-based monsters, capable of Synchro/Link Summoning. Their Equip Spells help gather materials for Synchro/Link Summons, while also giving bonus effects to archetype-monsters (or Entities) when using said resources as materials. Many of their cards require controlling a Tuner to get their full effects. Following a trend my archetypes have, the (somewhat humanoid) female members of the archetype are Tuners, while the more monstrous, bulkier members are non-Tuners. The Deck’s main mechanic is that all monsters except the Links set themselves at the end of the Battle Phase, meaning you can flip them, trigger their effects, attack, and then have their flip effects reset. They will remind you of “Subterrors”, but with a stronger focus on the Extra Deck. As of January 2020, the deck has been receiving lots of updates, taking advantage of the new Master Rule 5, allowing the Deck to Extra Link. Many of the links have been completely revamped, now instead triggering effects depending on their being co-linked or extra linked. The deck is certainly a lot more aggressive than before, and is still being updated.
Deck example link

 

An average “Swambush” card, representing the Deck: It’s a Flip Monster with a simple effect, it has an effect related to the tuners of the archetype (in its case Specialling itself for free), sets itself at the end of the battle phase and finally gives some kind of minor bonus to a Synchro or Link “Swambush” monster using it as a material.

 

Title: Raidge Clan

Link
Level: Average
Description: After being tired of creating Entity-connected archetypes for a while, I decided to go for a bit more classic theme, inspired by my delving into the Conan universe and the DM early monsters, like “Zombyra the Dark” and “Goblin Attack Force”. “Raidge Clan” monsters are very simplistic, all of them boasting high stats for Level 4s, and all of them having 2 effects, one of which is the archetype’s main mechanic: During the End Phase, if they did not “kill” this turn, they lose their effects and their attack is halved. Apart from all the monsters being Fire Warriors with exactly 200 def, the main feature of the “Raidge Clan” are their Spells/Traps, all of which give monsters of the archetype permanent, powerful self-boosting effects, which can keep piling, along with exactly 300 ATK boosts from each (so you can use counters to determine their exact ATK each time, same way the “Vurko” worked). The idea is that the “Raidge Clans” can keep growing from Spells, but if during your turn you do not “kill” anything with them, they will lose everything they have gained for 2 turns. For that reason, both the field spell and the link 4 give “Raidge Clans” the ability to “kill” your own cards if needed, allowing them to keep their effects. The Deck is also surprisingly good at Swarming, able to Summon 2 Link 4s with an average hand and a single rekidnling, while still setting up a negate or two. In the Deck’s main features, add the ability to recover “Rekindling” itself with the effect of the Link 2 (though it’s not usable in the same turn).
Deck example link

 

Title: Enemy of Justice

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Created on somewhat of a dare, the deck aims to specifically make the most useless of the original “Ally of Justice” monsters playable, with as few custom cards used as possible. The Deck is meant to specifically run the Level 5 and 6 monsters of the archetype, including the normals, and on a further dare, it is meant to work together with the (original) equip Spells that specifically list “Machine”. The Link 2 and the Level 11 Synchro are the only Extra Deck monsters practically used. I often get the comment “this shouldn’t work”, but the Deck works brilliantly, and has honestly been one of the most pleasant surprises for me. As a last thematic note, the name of the Continuous Trap is “Gears Crisis”, in referrence to Vanguard, as I was getting sick of seeing people directly copy-paste Vanguard decks in Yugi, and I wanted to draw inspirations from it the right way.
Deck example link

A characteristic Raidge Clan monster: Two effects, one of which is its unique effect (in his case being a small Honest (which is more of an excuse for an easy send of a 200 DEF FIRE monster to the GY)), a big ATK stat for a Level 4 monster, and the major nerf that is the common mechanic of the archetype, if he has not “killed” this turn.

 

Title: Bujin Degeneracy

Link
Level: Average
Description: Like with Allies of Justice (though this was created way before them), I wanted to “fix” the Bujin Deck, using as few custom cards as possible. I have linked the archetype to the Entities. Lorewise, “Bujin Hiruko” was originally corrupted by Shub-Niggurath, and the archetype reflects that. The Xyz has proved to be a spectacular success, with the Deck mostly turning into a slow beatdown, with “Shub Nig” “birthing” new Tokens every turn (that tend to be gigantic 3k beatsticks), while the original “Bujin” beast monsters banish themselves from the GY to slowly exhaust the opponent’s resources. Practically only 5 of the 8 custom cards of the Deck are needed, with the other 3 being mostly extras that are, however, fun to use.
Deck example link

 

Title: Element Charge

Link
Level: Average
Description: In one of my more… “Experimental” creations, this deck aims to use both the original 6 “Element ” monsters (notice the space after the word, the cards are not actually support for elemental heroes and the like) and “Homonculus, the Alchemic Being”, along with “Scroll of Bewitchment”. The Link 1s are the main playmakers, with the Attribute changes introducing a lot of fun plays to the deck. Definitely a weak one in terms of power, but pretty fun to play. Originally I wanted them to also use the various element “Mirror Force” cards, but ultimately decided against it.
Deck example link

 

Also read: The Pro’s Guide to Customs

The Field Spell I made to support “Bujin”. Typical 300 ATK/DEF boost, protection from non-targeting and non-destroying effects specifically (so that with turtle and hare they get a full set protection),and a minor floating effect.

Title: The Hounts

Link
Level: Average
Description: Thematically, “the Hounts” are one of my finest, if not my finest, works. The whole archetype was inspired by a combination of “The Witcher” (the first game) and the 3rd book of the “Harry Potter” franchise (specifically Serius’es animal form and how it was perceived as a sign of bad omens), “the Hounts” are all Zombie dogs. The name is a combination of the words “Hound” and “Haunt”, and the individual names of each monster are derived from superstitions people have had since the dark ages, about bad omens. There are exactly 2 monsters from each attribute (Earth focusing on dealing damage, Wind focusing on swarming, Water focusing on discarding effects that fill the GY, Fire are the Fusions, Dark are the Xyz, and Light are the Links). Each “Hount” has an original effect of its own, and then 3 more effects that they “unlock”, depending on how low the opponent’s LP are (the 3 effect thing with bullet points and “unlocking” is one of my favourite tropes, you will see it again in a few archetypes). The unlockable effects are all exactly at 6000/4000/2000 opponent’s LP respectively. The 6000 boost is always some ATK boost, the 4000 effect is some kind of protection for all the “Hounts”, and the 2000 effect is a lockdown for a specific kind of Summon (specifically the maindeck monsters all each lock a specific kind of Summon from the Extra Deck, while the Extra Deck monsters all lock a specific kind of Summon of maindeck monsters). The idea is that the more “afraid” the opponent is (aka the lower LP he has), the more he tends to see things negatively, making the superstitions (the “Hounts”) deadlier to him. While the Deck boasts some impressive swarming, especially from the GY, its free-summon effects also tend to lock the Attribute of monster they just Summoned, meaning you will have to keep Summoning different monsters each time, and there is a high chance of locking yourself out of an Attribute if you’re not careful. Despite its swarming capabilities, the Deck is fairly weak until it unlocks its first effect (the 6000 one), so you will have to rely on outside help to make it work. Personally I run “Everliving Underworld Cannon” X3, as well as “Vampire Fraulein” X3, which is lethal in this deck (you give the max boost both times you will use her effects, once the opponent’s LP are down their chances of winning drop drastically because of all the abilities your cards start getting, so running low on LP yourself is not a problem).
Deck example link

 

Title: Eveland of Wants

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Basically 2 different handtrap archetypes that are connected to each other, meant to work in a single deck, or alternatively be ran in any Deck, depending on the meta. “Evelands” are Earth Plant dryads, a defensive handtrap archetype, while “of Wants” are DARK Fiend succubi, handtraps that punish very specific things (way more specific than the ghost girls), but in exchange their “punishments” go way beyond simple negates. The dual archetypes are inspired by the story of Lilith as being Adam’s first wife, with heavy BDSM themes. The “Evelands” representing her soft human side (the names all have double meaning, meant to interpeted as either acts of compassion OR as softcore bdsm type plays), while “of Wants” being her darker, harsher side, the names of the monsters all being types of bdsm dominatrixes (the more hardcore side of bdsm respectively). Originally they also had dual field spells, but then Konami did that theme with “Dream Mirrors” and I got bitchy about it, so I combined their field spells into one. Gameplay wise, “Evelands” focus on resource building or otherwise protecting your cards, while “of Wants” are the more aggresive side of the Deck. The Deck will continuously discard cards and trigger effects from that, with limited but respectable resource recovering. The main win condition of the Deck is Link Summoning the Link 2 sub-bosses and Link 4 boss. The succubi all have 0 Def on purpose, so they can be easily “Salvage”‘d with “Recurring Nightmare” and triggering even one of their punishments will likely mess up the opponent’s plays real bad.
Deck example link

 

A trap card for the Hounts. The first effect is a minor self-removal, mostly so that you can get some use out of already doomed “Hounts” that have been targeted by your opponent for removal. The second effect, though soft OPT, is a GY revival (fitting zombies) while also Attribute-locking, which is a common theme for the Hounts.

 

Title: Going New Clear

Link
Level: Average
Description: Inspired by the song “Going Nuclear” by Miracle of Sound (which in turn was made to promote Fallout 4), “New Clears” are post-apocalyptic monsters with a love for puns. The name comes from a reference to “New Vegas”, which was my favourite “Fallout” game, and obviously intending to sound like “Nuclear”. Every single one of their card names is a pun related post-apocalypsies, with one of them being a crossover with another of my archetypes. The archetype was recently updated (January 2020), getting rid of the previous Trap immunity the monsters had. The mechanics of “New Clear” monsters are now: 1)Gaining 100 ATK/DEF for every quick-play spell in the GYs. 2)Doing “X” during your Standby Phase. The Spells are all Quick-Plays with the exception of the Field Spell, and all of them work by targeting a “New Clear” monster, which they will destroy during the End Phase (the Spells are mutations caused by radiation poisoning lorewise). For the most part, the Spells give permaboosts to your monsters. In other words, if you can somehow avoid the End Phase destruction (with Blightan’s protection or some non-archetype card like “Forbidden Dress”), your monsters tend to become gigantic beatsticks with evergrowing stats.  “Raidge Clan” from above are basically this mechanic’s evolution. The deck benefits from a “chain link” playstyle, earning its best results if you go all out instead of playing conservatively (chaining all your quick-plays to each other and overextending). The Deck’s best card is (probably) “Blightan”, protecting all your “New Clears” from card effect destruction, letting you spew quick-play spells mindlessly.
Deck example link

 

Title: Explosion of Madma

Link
Level: Average
Description: “Madma” are FIRE Rock monsters with 400 DEF (so that with “Molten Destruction” they will have exactly 0 DEF), made of magma, with Rank 4 and 7 monsters being the Deck’s main bosses. The Deck’s main mechanic is what I call “Meltdown”. The monsters drop their ATK to 0 as a cost, in order to activate various effects. Because the text specifically mentions “reducing” their ATK to 0, that means that a “Madma” monster that already has 0 ATK cannot activate its Meltdown effect. Due to this restriction, almost all of the cards in the deck (with the exception of those that generate card advantage) have no opt restrictions, which is the Deck’s main gimmick: As long as you can keep boosting their ATK back up, you can trigger their effects more than once per turn. It is strongly suggested that you run “Forbidden Scripture” X3 in this. As a secondary theme, many of the cards have their effects slightly enhanced if you control “Molten Destruction” (for example said effects can be turned to Quick Effects, or you can ignore their drawbacks, stuff like that), though it is by no means integral to the Deck. The deck is still a work in progress (there are some aspects of it that do not satisfy me yet), but for now it is effective and explosive.
Deck example link

 

Yugioh Archetype Guide - Madma

Madma’s simplest, most generic card, that also showcases the deck’s mechanic perfectly.

 

Title: Memory Devourers

Link
Level: Average
Description: A deck I use for playing Classic (though that was coincidental because of its main mechanic), the Deck focuses on punishing the use of the Extra Deck, while at the same time having no Extra Deck of its own, employing multiple Traps. Much of the Deck’s art is taken from “Agony Unrated”, a game I played before designing the Deck, though most of the inspiration came from the original “Memory Crusher”, “Memory Crush King” and “Memory Loss”, regarding the playstyle and themes. Thematically, the monsters are all demons tormenting the one sent to hell, and slowly eating away their positive memories, until they are left hollow husks. The traps are the negative memories left, which are used by the demons to torment the damned person into submission. The monsters are divided into monsters punishing the opponent’s Extra Deck and monsters revolving around the “Memory” traps and their effects. The Traps are all Normal Traps, with 2 effects that you can trigger, one requiring you to have no cards in the Extra Deck (which you will basically trigger every time), and one for controlling a Level 5 or higher “Memory” monster (which is a bonus effect). The name of “Memories of a Nobody” is a reference to a “Bleach” movie I had seen years ago. The deck has no main playmakers, though “Memory Haunter” will probably be your signature card to go, followed by “Memory Gust”.
Deck example link

 

Title: Purity of Nothingness

Link
Level: Advanced
Description: Inspired by Don Thousand’s no-card play during his first duel (against Mizael) in Zexal, the deck is meant to be what a divine/godly villain would use. The deck is also a reference to the attempted corruption of Death the Kid in the Soul Eater manga, a character obsessed with symmetry, by promising him the “Symmetry of Nothingness” (the perfect symmetry he would achieve by destroying everything) (one of the Spells is specifically named after that in tribute to the manga). The theme of the deck is that peace is achieved once there is nothing left to destroy. All the cards names are related to the idea of peace, in one way or another, and all the monsters are named after Sumerian demons in addition to the peace theme. All the monsters are Level 9 WIND Fairies, basically giant creatures travelling alone in space (where there is “nothing”). All the monsters are basically average bosses and, with the exception of one, none of them has an effect to Summon itself, so you have to rely of the Spells/Traps and the Link 1. The deck heavily utilizes columns for its effects, and specifically in which ones there are Spells/Traps and in which not. The deck’s main signature cards are “Khani” and “Gallu”, both of which can be tricked into blowing themselves up by a smart opponent willing to play a bit suicidally. You are meant to have no backrow in this Deck, the Traps activating themselves from your hand and many of your cards working only if you have no Spells/Traps on the field (besides them, and not counting Field Spells). Despite its (seemingly, only) simplistic playstyle, the Deck is capable of heavy aggro plays, though it is lacking in dealing damage fast (the chances of otking are slim, though you will easily outresource your opponent with all your destroys). The Link 1 is meant to unbrick your hands if you do not draw the field spell or something equivalent, and it is unlikely that you will be summoning the Link 2 and 3s.
Deck example link

 

Poor thing rarely sees use. “Nothingness” work better on their on, as Level 9 beatsticks.

 

Title: Trippin’ on da Voodoo

Link
Level: Average
Description: While the name of the Deck is inspired by an old Gigi song from WoW, the theme of the deck was actually inspired by American Horror Story’s Season 3, and my old fascination with the voodoo style of magic, from ever since I can remember (also possibly by my newfound love for Ivy Sherwood, but lets not get into that). The deck uses dual archetypes, the “Voodoo” ladies (DARK Spellcasters) who use their effects to Special Summon the “Loa” (DARK Zombie/Fiend Spirit Monsters) from the hand. I opted to lift the “cannot be Special Summoned” restrictions Spirits normally have, but in exchange these Spirits will bounce themselves during every End Phase, regardless of how they were Summoned. The Spells/Traps all have an LP cost, and multiple effects to choose from, representing the various contracts the “Voodoo” ladies can make with the “Loa”. “Undying Servant” doesn’t belong in either category, and was inspired by my favorite mechanic from Magic the Gathering: Undying (which is a free GY revival). Naturally, all the “Loas” have names inspired by “Voodoo” mythology. The Deck’s main boss is “Bosou Goblamin”, being a big beatstick, a much needed LP refiller and also a disabler of Spell passive effects (all 3 “big” maindeck Spirit Monsters negate passive effects of a card type).
Deck example link

 

Title: Arachnophobia

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Inspired by the playstyle of Aliens and the theme of Rudger Godwin’s spider Deck, with a touch of Entities, of course, Arachnophobias is a control Deck that can limit the opponent’s ability to Synchro and Link Summon by using Web Counters. Each monster shares the effect that “Monsters with Web Counters cannot be used as Synchro or Link Materials.”, and they all trigger some kind of effect when you (specifically you) remove a monster with Web Counters from the field (Web Counters can only be placed on opponent’s monsters). Relatively simplistic in their playstyle, the deck’s signature card is its Synchro “Old Entity of Arachnophobia – Atlas-nach”. The deck also uses a secondary theme of requiring banished insects to work its full effects, which is mostly handled by outside sources.
Deck example link

 

This bad girl and a 2-3 backrow are a perfectly adequate opening move for Arachnophobia. You can see the typical mechanic of the archetype (Synchro/Link lockdown for monsters with Web Counters) at the start, and the second archetype mechanic (do “X” when you kill something with Web Counters) in the end.

 

Title: The Grand Order

Link
Level: Average
Description: The “Grand Order” take their name from the Fate series. They are an archetype consisting of Fairy and non-Fairy monsters, with gameplay that follows their theme first and practicality second, though even with that limitation, they have proved very successful. All the maindeck monsters are Level 4. All the maindeck Fairy monsters work like “Dark Worlds”, in the sense that they all have 1 activated effect (except for their respective “Singer of Cosmic Horrors”), which triggers specifically when they’re sent from the hand to the GY as a cost for a card effect (keep in mind: not for the activation of a card, specifically for the activation of an effect). That means they will trigger from “Knightmares” etc. Also keep in mind that the vast majority of them are NOT “once per turn”, so you can recycle them freely and keep bringing the pain. The non-Fairy monsters are there for their swarming abilities, acting as materials for the Extra Deck monsters or as living shields for the fairies, and they all share the common effect of giving 100 ATK/DEF to Fairies while they are in the GY. The Extra Deck monsters specifically cannot use the Fairies (except for the “Entity” one). Lorewise, the “Grand Order” are an army of Fairy chicks, inspired by the angels of Christian religion. They promise their human followers salvation and a place in Paradise for serving them… Which is a complete lie, as they see humans unworthy of Paradise, instead using the humans as cannon fodder (living shields, or otherwise materials for their Xyz), while also gaining power from the souls of their fallen followers (the +100 effect all non-Fairies have in the GY). In truth, the “Grand Order” serve only themselves and their “Entity” leaders, dooming their followers into eternal slavery and pointless perishing, with no sign of salvation. It is not coincidental that the Spells/Traps of the archetype only support the Fairies specifically.
Deck example link

 

Title: Power World

Link
Level: Average
Description: After watching GX dub’s episode “Dueling with the Dark Army”, I fell in love with Zure’s “Power” deck, and I just had to make it into an actual deck to get it out of my head. Being a combination of Dark Fiends and Dark Thunders, the Deck uses ATK manipulations and soft lockdowns to play control long enough to aggro the opponent fast, using the effect of “Power Zone” to enable OTKs. The deck will have the most trouble against other aggro decks, as the Field Spell’s effect can end up hurting the user as well (I am a firm believer in cards backfiring by smart plays). “Power Devastator” is arguably the best card of the deck, able to have very fun interactions against specific kinds of decks, with “Power Filter” (TCG card) being a close second, able to completely lock out many plays. Finally, the Deck’s Link Monsters are specialised into dealing with the opponent’s “unfair” plays. While I haven’t capitalized on this yet in my own deck, it is possible to use the “Forbidden” Quick-Play Spells to give protections to your opponent’s monsters, that will then make them vulnerable to the Links. The Deck can also run “Thunder Dragon Colossus”, for alternative strategies.
Deck example link

Yugioh Customs Guide

The only “Grand Order” Extra Deck monster not needing specific materials, since he, in turn, is also using the angel chicks. Don’t feel too bad for them though.

 

Title: Carcosa Force

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Using the dual archetypes “Byakhee” (WIND Fiends), whose job is to swarm and provide easy Synchro Materials, and “Carcosa Force” (WIND monsters), the Deck is made in honor of Hastur and his Yellow Mythos, which has been the basis for many of my projects, and the whole Deck is meant to support “Old Entity Hastorr” (and other “Entities”, but mostly “Hastorr”). The deck is also themed after the art of Paolo Leuteri and his “Druuna” series, which I have always connected with the Yellow Mythos.
Deck example link

 

Title: Into the Darkwood

Link
Level: Advanced
Description: Descendants of the “Swambush” (which are in turn descendants of the “Vurko” which are in turn descendants of the “Entities”), the “Darkwood” are inspired by the horror video game “Darkwood” that I played about a year ago. In the game, running away from monsters in the woods often led to falling upon even more monsters, which was the basis for the deck’s main mechanic: When the opponent receives battle damage, the “Darkwoods” can Summon themselves from the hand. As always, the female members of the archetype are tuners (despite the deck having no Synchros of its own). The deck has a heavy emphasis on Fusions (I made them at a time when I loved “Lunalights”), and all the Maindeck “Darkwoods” trigger some kind of effect when used as Fusion Materials. The Spells/Traps will often trigger effects when battle damage is inflicted and all the ones that go to the GY on their own have some kind of protection they can give from the GY by banishing themselves. Needless to say, the deck can hit hard and fast, but it is still a combo deck that relies on inflicting damage, which is its greatest weakness. The deck has crossovers with many archetypes, including “Voodoo”. The deck’s endgame monster, “Age of Winter” was only recently created, and is a reference to the archetype that will follow after the “Darkwoods” lorewise, the “Eye Sage” (and so its effect). Your key-card in the Deck will most likely be “Darkwood Berserker” (in almost every game where I use them, he’s the one that grands me the win).
Deck example link

 

A typical “Darkwood” card. Two effects: The common mechanic of free specialling from hand when a “Darkwood” monster deals damage, and the common mechanic of doing “something” when used as a Fusion Material. In her case, she adds a utility TCG Spell that can help boost the damage even more, keeping your poor attack target alive and unwell.

 

Title: The Endless

Link
Level: Average
Description: Inspired by white phosphorus and the severe burns it can cause, “the Endless” are a Zombie archetype (Tuners and Extra Deck monsters are Light Attribute, the rest Earth) focusing on outgrinding the opponent and feeling “endless” during the endgame. The Extra Deck monsters all have the word “Ash” in their name, in reference to them being the “original” Zombies of the archetype, created from humans who died due to the usage of white phosphorus and were reanimated by the “Old Entity of the Endless – Gla’ak”. A secondary theme of the deck is the undead cult of the Glaaki, from the Cthulhu Mythos, and its famous book, “Revelations of the Glaaki”, which is related to the “divination” mechanic some of the cards use. Every monster of the archetype can only be Summoned once per turn, in any possible way (that even includes Normal Summons). In exchange, the common mechanic of the archetype is: “If this card is destroyed and sent to the GY: Target 1 “The Endless” monster in your GY; Special Summon it.”. That even includes the very same monsters that were just destroyed, if one turn has passed since you Summoned them. You can use this effect, along with their individual effects, to slowly gather a toolbox in your GY, that you can basically tag out by suiciding them (either by attack, or by using your Spell/Trap effects to intentionally destroy them). In the endgame, if the opponent has no negation or banish effects and is only relying on brute force, they will have to go through Every. Single. Monster. in your GY to get to your LP, each turn. The Deck has crossovers with both “Voodoo” and “New Clears”.
Deck example link

 

Title: Energies of the Arcana

Link
Level: Average
Description: One of my earliest decks ever, the cards are basically support to the already-released “Arcana Force” cards. While the deck works satisfactory, I am disappointed by the high number of cards I ended up creating, though it is unlikely that I will rework the deck in the future.
Deck example link

 

Typical Endless monster, aka a part of the toolbox you gather in your GY and tag out by suiciding their pals on the field: An effect triggering on Summon and the common mechanic of reviving any Endless when destroyed, accompanied by the unique Summon restriction all Endless have.

 

Title: True Aliens

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Also one of my first decks, though I am much more satisfied with this result. The effects are both simple and effective, while keeping to the original theme of aliens. The deck introduced my first “Singer of Cosmic Horrors”, which was a name I thought cool, next to “Priestess of Entities”. The first ended up being a small, loosely connected archetype of its own, that you can find in most of my decks that have “Entity” support in them. “A Ritual of Grand Convergence” was a prototype card that I knew from the start wasn’t a practical choice, but I just wanted to make it, in reference to Dead Space. Ultimately, I made “the Converging” to satisfy that creative need. Lorewise, the “Aliens” came into contact with “Old Entity Hastorr”, resulting in the new, more “demented” cards.
Deck example link

 

Title: The Timeless

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Inspired by my love for hiking (no, seriously) and the barren, sunburnt mountainous wastelands Greece calls “wilds”, “the Timeless” are an archetype of golems (Earth, Rocks) which gain effects the more “ancient” they become, based on the turn count. The original concept was that as the turns passed, the monsters would start growing tentacles, influenced by their respective “Entity”, in the end turning to half-rock, half-plant monstrosities, in the final stages changing their Attribute/Type to Dark/Plant from Earth/Rock, but that time mechanic would have to work separately for each monster, which I didn’t like (it required keeping tabs on too many things). Instead, their theme changed to just desert creatures, inspired by a movie I had once seen in Athens’ Planetarium (the names of all the monsters mean “Earth”, in various languages). “The Timeless” unlock effects depending on the general turn count of the duel, similar to the “Final Countdown” card, on intervals of 5. At turn #15 the Deck reaches full power, and all 4 effects of each “Timeless” monster are unlocked. The deck has various ways to increase the turn count fast depending on the opponent’s actions. For the most part, you will be playing defensively until turn #10 (or more accurately, until the turn count reaches #10, it might still be the 4th-5th turn of the duel), when the “Timeless” will unlock their second effects and start getting more dangerous. At #15 you will start playing full aggro, with heavy beatsticks, protections and even some lockdowns. Each maindeck monster has the same ATK/DEF, referencing how they are golems and their defense is their attack. The maindeck monsters will boost themselves to exactly 2000 ATK/DEF with their own effects. The “Timeless” were the first archetype where I simply splashed one of the DM cards (in their case “Fissure” originally, then adding “Earthquake”) where it acted more as a bonus synergy card rather than the main focus of the deck, as I had done in the past. Thanks to a few new crossover cards they have with the “Promised Land”, I think I might retroactively make them the final descendants (for now) of the “Vurko” timeline, being the evolution of the “Promised Land” (though I had originally made them much earlier and with no intention of including them in that lore).
Deck example link

 

An average Timeless monster: An effect he has anyway, +3 unlockable effects at the 5/10/15 turn intervals.

 

Title: Eye Sage

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Level: Average
Description: The descendants of the “Darkwood” (which are the descendants of the “Swambush” which are the descendants of the “Vurko” which are the descendants of the “Entities”), the “Eye Sage” (say the name out loud, you will get it) are Dark Psychic monsters, focusing on “freezing” the opponent’s cards, negating their effects (they differentiate between activated and non-activated effects) until the next Standby Phase. They also give the opponent’s cards minor effects that they can negate, triggering other effects, and in general play around the opponent’s field and the cards’ whose effects are partially negated. During each End Phase, the Field Spell will destroy and banish all cards with at least 1 negated effect, meaning effect negation is equal to destruction in the deck. With 3 card combos, the deck can completely “freeze” Monsters/Spells/Traps the opponent controls (one type for each combo). The Deck plays a combination of control and aggro, able to Summon high-level beatsticks easily that do lockdowns of their own.
Deck example link

 

Title: Venom

Link
Level: Weak
Description: Once again, support for a classic archetype, the goal being to use as few cards as possible. I would say it went pretty well.
Deck example link

 

I’m not a fan of “If this card is Normal or Special Summoned” as a text. I think it makes things too easy. Pick one and stick with it.

Title: Starfriends

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Level: Advanced
Description: Possibly the most malicious theme I have ever made, “Starfriends” start the game as a simple cute animal deck, with a minor focus on discarding. Each of them has a passive GY effect for the mysterious “Starfiends”, which the opponent will probably assume is a misspelling of “Starfriend” upon seeing the deck for the first time… And then the deck will show its true face, with the true form of every “Starfriend” monster being an aspect of Nyarlathotep, named after a “holy war” conducted in the name of religion in mankind’s history. For example “Starfriend Crudy” is the fake form of “Starfiend of Crusade”, “Starfriend Blits” is “Starfiend of Blitzkrieg”, etc. Ideally (and quite easily achievable) the “revelation” will happen after you have summoned 2-3 “Starfriends” on the field, by playing “Starfriend Face Tearing”, which does an 180 degree change in the artwork from cutesy to cosmically terrifying. The story is partially told by the 3 normal monsters, which are all stages in the life of a girl with psychic powers called “Sora”, who moved to a town far away from the big city where she had grown up. Being lonely and with no friends in her new school, she started starwatching, wishing to the sky for friends. Nyarlathotep used this to take advantage of her psychic powers, tricking her into Summoning his aspects, which in turn corrupt Sora into “Starfiend of Sensou”. With each time passage, the initial “Twinkle twinkle little star” poem that is written as the flavor text of “Sora” becomes more distorted. Each “Starfiend” requires its “fake form” to be in the GY in order to be Summoned, and they each have 3 effects: One effect for Summoning itself, one activated effect, and one lockdown effect. Most of the Spell/Traps support “Starf” monsters, so they will support both the fake, “Starfriend” forms, and the true, “Starfiend” forms of the monsters. Though the deck is pretty powerful on its own, the main selling point is the opponent’s horrified reaction when the cutesy star animals turn to lovecraftian horrors.The deck is pure evil, and you will love it for it.
Deck example link

 

Title: Obyrinthian Nightmares

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Level: Average
Description: Serving as a prototype for the “Dimensional Family”, this deck is support for the 5 vanilla “Clown” monsters, giving them a fusion archetype that needs them as materials, called “Obyrinthian”, which are Mesopotamian and Sumerian demons, the most famous of which is “Pazuzu”, who was the antagonist of the “Exorcist” franchise. There is one “Obyrinthian” for each specific normal clown (sharing its Attribute and sharing its stats +1000), requiring the specific clown as material + 1 monster, letting the deck do “Super Polymerization” shenanigans. There are also Fusions needing vanilla “Clown” monsters with different names as materials. Each Fusion has a specific kind of self-protection, and all of them share the effect that opt they can target an “Obyrinthian” in the GY and permanently absorb its non-activated effects (the passive protections). The idea is that the “Obyrinthians” are the true forms of the clowns, inspired by Stephen King’s “It” and its true form, a giant spider. Lorewise, “Hostess of Nightmares” is meant to be the same monster as “Voodoo Showlady” (their connection shown in the Spell “Voodoo Dreams of Darker Deals”, connecting the 2 decks). The deck focuses on control, and fusing with the opponent’s monsters, while also triggering effects every time it Fusion Summons.
Deck example link

 

The Obyrinthians were inspired by Psy-Frames, except they try not to be annoying (also they’re fusions needing Polymerization). Their stats are equal to the specifically listed Vanilla Clown needed as a material, +1000.

 

Title: Taste of the Mooyan Spark

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Level: Average
Description: Designed with plenty of humor, “Mooyan Spark” is an archetype of Water and Fire monsters, making the Spells “Mooyan Curry” and “Sparks” viable. Each monster triggers some kind of effect when “Mooyan Curry” (for Waters) or “Sparks (for Fires) is activated, with the most dangerous being the Normal Pendulum Monster “Nina”, and her mandatory, non-targeting destruction triggering every time “Sparks” is activated. Despite relying on such weak Spells the deck can generate a lot of advantage, with its Normal Trap being a potential +2 if its full effect gets triggered. Many of its cards can also increase the healing/damage done by “Mooyan Curry” and “Sparks” respectively, making them actually viable stat changers in the duel. The signature card of the deck is “Grand Arrival of the Mooyan Spark”, which is an ideal opening card in every duel.
Deck example link

 

Title: Deadline of the Yamimakai

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Level: Elite
Description: Based on the “Limit Break” mechanic of Vanguard, the “Yamimakais” are a fiend kingdom, which is growing insane by the “Entities”, switching from organized military to bloodthirsty frenzied mobs of mutated monsters, relying more on rituals and ceremonies than battle tactics (you can read some of the details from the flavor texts of the normal monsters). The deck focuses heavily on Normal Monsters, which are used as materials for the Synchros (which are also treated as Normal Monsters), as well as treating them as a resource for many effects. “Yamimakais” unlock more effects the lower your Life Points are (basically the reverse of the “Hounts”, which were created much later), going into killing frenzies. The deck revolves heavily around the Field Spell, “Yamimakai” (though it can work easily without it as well), which also unlocks more effects the lower your Life Points get, the most iconic of which being that at 500 or less LP, all damage you receive is reduced to 0. This means you will be intentionally playing suicidally, reducing your LP continuously with the “Yamimakai” effects (all of which cause you damage when activated), so that when you are 1 step away from “death” you are actually playing the deck at its maximum power. In case things go “awry”, the Link 1 can be banished from the GY to reduce the damage to 0 once.
Deck example link

 

Yamimakai were the first Archetype in which I tried this bullet thing. I fell in love with it and the idea of unlockable effects right away.

 

Title: Succubus Party

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Level: Advanced
Description: The succubi are a series of Pendulum Monster “hostess” anime girls in the entertainment industry, having their very own fun house, “Succubus Castle of Sweet Dreams”. They can work their effects when the opponent’s monsters are “sleeping” (aka when they are in Defense Position), and can heavily recycle “Block Attack” to make that happen, with each Spell/Trap in the GY improving its effects when activated. The deck also features heavy anti-Link themes, for obvious reasons, with the “Succubi” putting various lockdowns on Links. Despite my efforts to make the effects as simple as possible, the deck might have still ended up being a bit too complicated, and opponents are likely to get headaches once they are done admiring how a deck relying on “Block Attack” as its signature card is actually beating them.
Deck example link

 

Title: Road of Blood

Link
Level: Average
Description: A Synchro deck consisting of Light Zombies and plenty of Spells (Blood Magic). Almost all of the Spells have a single effect with a large LP cost to be paid, which can be ignored if you control a Zombie Synchro monster. Nearly all of the monsters are related to the use of Spells, usually in the form of banishing them from the GY to trigger various effects. Most of the decks’ cards are generic, working in a similar manner as “Deep Sea Chorus”, where they can work both as a deck on their own, or as techs in other decks.
Deck example link

 

Archetype Collection - Yugioh

 

Title: The Dimensional Family & Wicked Invaders Decks

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Link 2
Level: Advanced
Description: The “Dimensional Family” are a series (not an actual archetype) of Dark Fiend Fusion support. aiming to support other decks rather than be a deck on their own, acting as an engine. Looking like your average nightmare fuel, the “Dimensionals” will trigger a variety of effects related to Dark Fiend Fusions/Links, while also locking you to said Attribute/Type combination for the rest of the turn. The cards were mostly created as support for the “Ancient Fiends” fusion series. Each of the “Ancient Fiends” Fusions requires 2 specific, DM era Dark Fiend Effect Monsters as materials, and their stats (Level, Atk, Def) are the sum of the materials’ stats. Their effects are also a combination of the basic effects of the materials. The Fusions are made for pairs of 5 specific Fusion Materials, each material being required in at least 2 Fusions. The name “Wicked Invaders” came from Yukio’s Japenese Pronounciation of “Invaders Must Die”, from the last animated arc of “Bleach”, the Fullbring Arc. Each of the links below is a using a different set of 5 materials. Though the support from the “Dimensional Family” is the same, the recipes of each deck are different, based on what the Fusions do.
Deck example link
Deck example link 2
Deck example link 3
Deck example link 4
Deck example link 5
Deck example link 6

 

Title: The Promised Land

Link
Level: Weak
Description: The descendants of “Eye Sage” (“Entities”->”Vurko”->”Swambush”->”Darkwood”->”Eye Sage”->”Promised Land”), these desert titans hunt the poor survivors of the “Eye Sage”, who moved from one apocalypse to another. The name “Promised Land” is ironic, paralleling the Jews’ escape from the Egyptians, in the Bible. Whereas the Jews were promised a land of “milk & honey” for their suffering at the hands of the Egyptians and that was delivered to them, the people who survived during the harsh “Eye Sage” apocalypse, promised their children a land of paradise, once the “Eye Sage” was over. However, what followed the freezing cold temperatures were burning hot ones, the landscape transforming into an endless desert, ruled by gigantic predators. The name “What Comes After Winter” is a reference to that, and so is the effect of the Continuous Trap, using the main mechanic of the “Eye Sage” for effect negations till the Standby. All the monsters’ names, except for the Tuners, are synonyms for “despair”, in the same manner that the “Nothingness” monsters were named after “peace”. The “Promised Land” mechanic is that effects trigger when the monsters switch from Defense to Attack Position. All level 6 or higher non-Synchro monsters also share the mechanic that they have an effect to Special Summon themselves from the hand (each with different conditions), and they also share the mechanic of triggering an additional effect when they are used as Synchro Materials. Keep in mind that the Archetype uses no effects whatsoever to add cards from the Deck, specifically so you can run “Mistake” in it X3.
Deck Example Link

 

Possibly the best card of the “Dimensional” Family. A target for Instant Fusion, that also acts as a Monster Reborn afterwards.

 

Title: Vylswarm Infection

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Level: Elite
Description: The very first deck I ever created, the “Vylswarms” are born a few years after the original Duel Terminal storyline ended. With the technology of the past archetypes being long since gone and the world operating mostly on magic, a single researcher and loner manages to bring back an offline robotical unit, which he believes to be “Ally of Justice” tech. After the unit tricks him into connecting it with other robotic parts that have been gathered as scraps, it reveals itself to be the remains of “Vylon Desigma”, which, at the moment of its “death”, as the last of the “Vylon Core” finally comprehended organics and completely fused with the “Lswarm” virus, becoming the “Vylswarm Core”. The “Vylswarms” are fusions of organics and machines, creating semi-mechanical angel-like beings that spread the virus on bodies they deem worthy, purging the rest, acting as both a singular AI unit and as separate “Lswarm” souls. The “Vylswarms” are themed after the 10 Plagues of Egypt from the Bible. “Vylswarms” are always treated as both “Vylons” and “Lswarms” taking advantage of all the support of both, maintaining the Equip Spell mechanics of the “Vylons” and the swarming and lockdown mechanics of the “Evilswarms”, along with their “Infestation” cards. The deck is also used by the female lead/final villain, Sena, of an alternative Yugioh storyline I’ve written for some time now, called “Yugioh Elite” (which I am hoping to one day be able to release as a single player campaign mode forYugioh Pro).
Deck example link

 

Title: Fidelity

Link
Level: Weak
Description: A series of light warrior nuns, serving the “Grand Order” from above. The monsters follow the average formula of having 1 effect to Special Summon themselves, and 1 effect that triggers when they are tributed, similar to the “Darkwood”. The tributing is mostly handled by TCG cards.
Deck example link

 

The simplest of the “Vylswarms”, in the spirit of “Evilswarm Mandragora”. You will notice the 50s in the ATK/DEF, the LIGHT Attribute and the Equip Spell – related mechanic.

 

Title: Vora

Link
Level: Weak
Description: A play on the words “Loa” and “-vore”, “Vora” are the Spirit archetype successor of the “Voodoo” ladies, who have made a deal with the Loa “Papa Ghede” (as shown in the art of “Vora Loa Merge” and “Vora Epiphany of the Voodoo”), changing from mere summoners to vessels of the Loa spirits, becoming half-spirit hybrids themselves. “Vora” are all DARK Warriors/Spellcasters, with no Extra Deck monsters (it is suggested that you run “Pot of Extravagance”, see the deck example). Getting rid of the End Phase bounce, “Vora” instead have an auto-return to hand effect whenever they are targeted by an opponent’s card or effect (this is not optional). This doubles both as a dodge, but also as a way for the opponent to play smart, essentially turning all his targeting effects to “Compulsory”s. The Spells/Traps all have 2 effects, 1 simple effect and a supercharged version of it, that can be triggered by shuffling 3 copies of the same Spell/Trap card from your GY into the Deck. Many of the monsters focus on quickly dumping Spells from the Deck to the GY, while “Vora Agwe” will deal with most annoyances in combination with your Spells.
Deck example link

 

Title: Song of the Cosmos


Link
Level: Weak
Description: A collection of all my “Singer of Cosmic Horrors” archetype sub-type, which have received support of their own as a Deck. I am still experimenting with this.

 

An example of a Vora Spell: A simple effect and a charged version of it by shuffling 3 copies of itself from the GY into the Deck. (Will probably put an extra requirement for you to control a “Vora” monster to trigger this one’s GY effect in the future).

 

Title: Expansion of the Gravemind

Link
Level: Weak
Description: “Graveminds” are a DARK Plant Xyz-based archetype that take their name from the leader of the Halo flood, though the inspiration came mostly from rewatching the movie “The Ruins” (which is for me is massively underestimated). “Graveminds” are single-minded collections of fungi, all growing out of corpses. This is reflected in their first common mechanic: The ability to Special themselves from the hand by banishing a monster of the same level from either GY. The archetype uses a bit of Level manipulation to make this more viable, but I have put most of the focus into triggering their second mechanic. The second common mechanic of the monsters is that all trigger an “X” effect when Specialled from the GY. Both effects are hopts, the text written in the same format as the BA. Initially I considered making them Zombies, but ultimately decided against it (mostly because we already have an overabudance of Zombie monsters with a Special from GY focus. All the Spells/Traps share the common mechanic of being banishable from the GY to boost a battling Plant monster by 400. Thanks to many of the “Gravemind” cards being generic Plant support instead of archetypal cards, the deck enjoys a lot of fun plays, especially with the sevely underestimated “World Carrotweight Champion” (which for me should be at least an X1 in every single Plant deck). Their Level 4 “Singer of Cosmic Horrors” also helps with Summoning level 8 bosses like “Beelze”, and in general the deck is quite versatile, if a bit bricky.
Deck example link

Title: Pack Fillers

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Link2
Description: Generic cards I have created, not meant to be used in any specific deck. The list will be updated every time I make new generic cards.

 

Yugioh-Guide Gravemind

A typical “Gravemind” monster: The self-Special from the hand by banishing a monster of the same Level, and the effect triggering when Summoned from the GY.

 

Have fun!

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Δημιουργός των Ayumi (+ enhanced edition), Broken Reality, The Devil Inside, Rot: A kinetic novel, ο Σταύρος ασχολείται από μικρή ηλικία με το gaming και το game development. Sucker για θρίλερ και το Cthulhu Mythos, θέλει να μοντερνοποιήσει πολλά στοιχεία του τελευταίου και να το ξαναφέρει στη mainstream horror κοινότητα.

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